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Do I need to wait for the criminal case to conclude before pursuing my civil claim?
What is “negligent security”?
Who can be held responsible?
How is “substantially similar” crime proven?
What is the “mutual combat” exception?
What does CCTV mean?
What should I do after I’ve been victimized?

What is a victim impact statement?

Rape and Sexual Assault Victims

RESOURCES

Crime Victim Advocacy Council

Georgia Crime Victims Compensation Program

Victim's Rights in the Parole Process

Crime Victim Bill of Rights

 

RESOURCES

 

Prosecuting Attorneys' Council of Georgia (locate local Victims' Assistance Offices)

Georgia Bureau of Investigation Sex Offender Registry

Victims Compensation and Services (GA Criminal Justice Coordinating Council)

National Victim Links
Crime And Victims Statistics (U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics)

Klaas Kids Foundation

MADD
 

RESOURCES

 

Victim Services Links

Prosecuting Attorneys' Council of Georgia (locate local Victims' Assistance Offices)

 

Georgia Bureau of Investigation Sex Offender Registry

 

Victims Compensation and Services (GA Criminal Justice Coordinating Council)

 

National Victim Links

Crime And Victims Statistics (U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics)

 

Klaas Kids Foundation

 

MADD

Crime Victims Compensation Fund

What is the Crime Victims Compensation Program?

Created by the Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, the program exists for two purposes:  (1) to assist victims with expenses incurred as a result of violent crimes; and (2) to encourage victims to participate in the criminal justice system.

In 2020, the Program awarded over $19 million to more than 6,700 victims in Georgia.  This program is funded indirectly by violent criminals, such as from probation fees, DUI fines, and parole fees.

Who can apply for crime victim compensation?

Broadly, anybody who has been the victim of a violent crime can be eligible.  Specifically, you are eligible if you meet one of the following criteria:

  • You are an innocent victim of a violent crime and suffered physical injury.

  • You went to the aid of another and suffered physical injury and/or serious mental or emotional trauma as a result of a violent crime.

  • You witnessed or were threatened with a crime and suffered serious mental or emotional trauma as a result.

  • You are the parent or legal guardian of a minor victim and you paid bills/out of pocket expenses related to the victimization.

  • You are the parent or legal guardian of a minor victim and you suffered a loss of income or support due to the victimization.

  • You are the surviving spouse, parent, sibling or child of a homicide victim (includes step relationships for crimes occurring on or after May 6, 2015).

  • You were legally dependent on financial support from a deceased crime victim.

  • You are a family violence victim who is dependent on financial support from the offender.

  • You are not the victim, but you have been paying bills related to the crime.

  • You are someone who has taken responsibility (or is listed as a guarantor) for debt incurred as a result of a violent crime.

Do I need a police report to be eligible?

Generally, yes, you must have reported the crime to law enforcement within 72 hours of the crime. 

 

However, if you were the victim of a sexual assault, you are not required to  have a police report to be eligible.  Instead, the Program will accept medical records from a forensic medical exam as proof of your assault. 

When must an application be filed?

A victim must file an application within 1 year of the crime, unless good cause is shown.  

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